Picasso Hides A Stranger in The Blue Room

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Art connoisseurs, collectors, scholars and historians are heralding the genius of Pablo Picasso as extensive research has finally proven the long held belief of a stranger hidden, etched, behind one of his greatest masterpieces.

 

Hiding behind the veil of The Blue Room which depicts a single women, nude, standing alone in a room, which is widely believed to be Picasso's studio, bathing, Picasso has hidden the figure of an bearded, old man, neatly dressed, wealthy, as the rings depict, with his chin resting on his hand.

Although art historians would never explain the find as an intentional depiction by Picasso who through tongue and cheek humor, or anger, exposed the voyeuristic tendencies of a friend, or as is believed the gallery owner, Ambroise Vollard, who first showed the young and relatively unknown painters work in Paris.

The other possibility of course, is less salacious, in that the young painter, still a struggling artist, simply ran out of clean canvases before The Blue Room inspiration came to him and he began to paint on what was available.

The blue period that is widely accepted as beginning in 1901 and carried the young artists through a very depressed season as he saw his expenses increasing and his work not selling.

The Blue Room which is permanently displayed in the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., is currently traveling through Hong Kong as part of a Picasso retrospective.