Celebrity Interview: Dianna Agron Talks Mayim Bialik, Naya Rivera, Indie Filmmaking

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Dianna Agron took television fans on an emotional ride playing complex popular girl, Quinn Fabray, on the hit television series Glee. The wildly popular show won multiple Emmy, Golden Globe, People's Choice, and Teen Choice Awards during its tenure.

Throughout the series, which ran for seven seasons on FOX, Agron's character portrayed a foray of teen girl issues ranging from the common to the more dramatic. From cattiness and romance drama to matters of celibacy, teen pregnancy, and adoption; nothing was off the table. It speaks to Agron's depth and range as an actress.

Since wrapping the show in 2015, Agron has gone on to build her resume in films, including winner of this year's Independent Spirit John Cassavetes Award-winning film, Shiva Baby, and most recently, As They Made Us, starring Agron, alongside Dustin Hoffman, Candice Bergen and Simon Helberg, and written and directed by Mayim Bialik.


Celebrity Interview: Director Craig Roberts and Writer Simon Farnaby Talk on The Phantom of the Open


Allison Kugel: I'm used to you as a brunette in this movie and here you are back to blonde-ish.

Dianna Agron:  I know, and I'm going back to brunette for another role in a month.

Allison Kugel: How did you like having the dark hair?

Dianna Agron: I do like it. I think that I always welcome the opportunity to change for a project.

Allison Kugel: Did you know Mayim Bialik, personally, before her film, As They Made Us, came to you?

Dianna Agron: I did not. I knew who she was by her work, but we didn't have a personal relationship prior to this film.

Allison Kugel: How did the role of Abigail come to you?

Dianna Agron: It was through my team. I immediately responded to the script and the character.  There is a lot of personal truth to my life, and it was being expressed through this piece. Mayim and I had a Zoom chat in which I felt that we connected deeply in our shared truths, but I had no idea if she felt that I was going to be right for the part. Within the hour I had the call that I was receiving the offer, and it just felt like a complete whirlwind and a surprise. I made my manager tell me the news again, because I thought, perhaps, I had heard him wrong. It was very sweet. 

Allison Kugel: The writing in this film was so good that you forget there is a script involved.

Dianna Agron: Yes. I think that is what I responded to as well, this very naturalistic feel.  It felt very embedded in truth and experience we kind of shared. We had a very strong open dialogue about grief, loss, love, and complicated relationships. Mayim had really incorporated in such a full spectrum of these emotions and how that works through individuals and a family, collectively. It did feel very real, and I obviously can speak personally about the elements that were very real for me. I think everybody brought their own truths to the table and incorporated those into their characters and into the story.

Allison Kugel: I can relate to it very much. I had a very complicated relationship with my dad, who is now living with us. It's a strange thing, because I remember growing up, and especially in my teens and twenties, I thought, "I can't wait to get away." We were constantly bumping heads. Now it has kind of come full circle and he's become a much gentler person in his older years. I've become much more understanding of human nature as I have gotten older, so you kind of meet somewhere in the middle.

Dianna Agron: I can understand that completely.

Allison Kugel: On another note, you are Jewish, Mayim is Jewish, I'm also Jewish. We are not always portrayed accurately or reasonably in the media, whether in television or film.  Like other minority groups, we are often made into caricatures. In As They Made Us, you see the complex humanity of a group of people, and what ties it all together that goes across all people of all different groups. That was another thing that I really enjoyed about this film. What is your opinion of how Jewish American's are typically portrayed?

Dianna Agron: It's interesting that you bring that up, because that was one of the things that I loved so much about this storytelling, is my character's connection to her Judaism and how that is expressed with her young children as she is teaching them, and how that part of her family aspect is just very causally there. It's just who they are and it's a part of her daily life. Obviously, there is a strong connection that she has to it, but that's not saying or doing so much.  It's just part of her character and part of her life. I do think that sometimes Jewish storytelling as it shows up in media is much more specific about either the Holocaust or you see it in Curb Your Enthusiasm, and this has been brought up and critiqued about Jews in film, where maybe one half of the couple is Jewish, but the other one isn't. There are just so many ways with how it is expressed in the media. Not to say that anything is necessarily right or wrong. I think it's project to project, but I did like that this was just an underlying element to who she was and that it just seemed so normal.

Allison Kugel: Not that the Curb Your Enthusiasms of the world are bad, I think they are great, but we need stuff like this too.

Dianna Agron: Yes, I think it does add to a balance. When I was promoting [the film] Shiva Baby, that whole film centers around one woman's experience at a shiva, mourning somebody that she kind of knows, and was brought to it by her parents. That was so interesting because everyone who was interviewing us about that film had said to us, "This is like my Italian family, this is like my Greek family," and so on. We all come from different cultural backgrounds, but there are common truths to dynamics with family, friends, or communities, which are so universal. It's been nice to be part of both films and have that kind of storytelling be incorporated into my work.


Celebrity Interview: Director Joe Berlinger Talks on John Wayne Gacy True Crime Series Part II


Allison Kugel: Although the material of As They Made Us is heavy at times, there are some really funny moments.

Dianna Agron: Especially Candice [Bergen]. She made me laugh so consistently throughout filming. Her delivery is perfectly spot on. And she is not trying to be [funny].  Her character is really just expressing things how she sees fit, which is so funny, because I think it is very understandable that everyone grieves in a different way. Some people say things that are wildly inappropriate to the moment, and it just feels so real and honest.

Allison Kugel: Towards the end of the film, Dustin Hoffman. who plays your father, his character passes away and there was a moment after the funeral that I loved where Candice Bergen's character, your mother, starts gossiping about people that were at the funeral. Your character, Abigail, gets mad at her. I actually said this out loud to my screen as I was watching.  I said, "That's how she's grieving! She's gossiping to take her mind off what just happened."

Dianna Agron: Totally. 

Allison Kugel: I think that is actually why people gossip at times, to kind of take our minds off the war in the Ukraine, the pandemic, all of these heavy things that are going on in the world. We need to focus on something else. We need to make it light.

Dianna Agron: Sometimes at the expense of other people (laugh). That is so not my experience. I feel it's the last thing I ever want to indulge in or engage in, but I so understand. That was the thing.  All of the characters are so human and then you have these incredible actors bringing such humanity to the screen in this way, in this story.  I had done a film with Candice about thirteen years ago where I also played her daughter. It was so wonderful to reconnect with her and to connect with her as an adult. I was such a young thing then. That I really enjoyed, and she is just as delightful and just as hilarious as ever. 


Allison Kugel: Was there a funny moment on set you can share where you had to kind of like break the tension and just have some fun in between takes?

Dianna Agron: I can't point to one exact moment, but I will say that every day we were experiencing this wealth of storytelling because we would ask Candice and Dustin about specific projects or what growing up in LA was like back then. They were just so generous and giving. I typically find that most actors love to share, on and off screen. It's not one or the other.  It usually is both. There were just many personal moments that they were sharing where you couldn't believe that the first director I had was so and so and the most famous line in that movie wasn't originally there and it was just found on the last day of filming and that was so special to be able to really dig in and ask them anything that we wanted. Simon, Mayim, and I were like, "Okay, and then this project, and tell me about this." I had no expectations.  I thought maybe they would want to go and be by themselves in between set ups and take rests. They were always there and game, and just so much a part of sharing at all given times. Then Candice has this very sweet dog Bruce who was always around and every now and then he would pipe up in a scene and we would have to relocate him.  It was really such a joyful experience despite being in an enormous amount of pain and sadness in moments on set.

Allison Kugel: What is Mayim Bialik like as a director?

Dianna Agron: What was so obvious to me after our first chat was that she had already thought about this project, and these characters in this world, so thoroughly that we could have gone and made that film the next day. It was so obvious that it was a story she could tell so beautifully. She really hired such a beautiful team of people that worked so well together. There was a feeling of ease, even though we were this kind of tiny but mighty crew.  Independent filmmaking isn't necessarily as glamourous or cushioned, but it is my preferred way to work. I love eliminating all the frills. It never felt like we weren't able to accomplish our goals for the day, which was such a testament to how well-organized Mayim was, and how well thought out and planned every day of shooting was. I loved watching Mayim's reactions to things.  I was always looking to her to see how she was experiencing what we were filming. 


Allison Kugel: Some of the subject matter of this film was about dying and death. What is your take on that part of the human experience? Where do you think we go? What do you think death is all about?

Dianna Agron: I've been dealing with many years of my father's own illness (Dianna's father suffers from an aggressive form of Multiple Sclerosis) and watching that move through his body. Unfortunately, I wouldn't imagine there is an enormous amount of time that we have left with him, which is really not what you would wish for at all, and very deeply sad. It has placed a lot of importance on the time that we have. He's been sick more years of my life than he has been well. The way I have had to process that, is that while I would have wanted the version of him, I knew as a very young person to last much longer, I am so lucky to have experienced many other versions of him and still have access to him and connect with him. It takes a toll in many different forms, your cognition, your physical health, etc. Death has been prevalent in my life, because I've lost many people that I loved, and it always feels like it wasn't the right time. I, unfortunately, lost many people when I was very young, and my father is very ill and only sixty-six years old. I pride myself in being very present with the moment with my family and my friends and knowing that your health and wellness are not guaranteed. That centers me a lot.  As [death] relates to everything on the Other Side, it's not something I often think about, but I'm sure that will be more prevalent the older I get.


Celebrity Interview: Director Joe Berlinger Talks on His Newest True Crime Netflix Series


Allison Kugel: Soon we will be coming up on the two-year anniversary of Naya Rivera's passing. Can you tell me what was unique about your friendship with her that was different from your other Glee castmates, or even from any other friendship in your life?

Dianna Agron: Naya was my first friend on set. We were quite isolated, because we weren't involved in the entire pilot. We had our very brief moments in the pilot, and everybody else was very involved in the singing, dancing, and all the rehearsals. So, she was my point person and we kind of instilled each other with confidence in those moments. She was just very unique and special in the way she carried herself with such confidence and certainty. If she believed in something, or in you as a person, she would always uplift those ideas. She was very, very strong in a way that I think I have adapted to moments in my own life that have been quite difficult and the adversity you can overcome if you experience it at a young age that makes you more resilient. She had that strength in spades. Any strength that I had she had ten times more of it.  It was really inspiring and nurturing to be around. She was also wickedly funny and had the best comedic timing. She is one of the people that I speak about when I say it's so strange to think she is not here. She had years and years of love and gifts to give people, and I was so lucky to know her.

Allison Kugel: That is beautiful. What do you think you came into this life as Dianna Agron to learn, and what do you think you came here to teach?

Dianna Agron: Whoa, not an easy question! I feel particularly connected to storytelling. When I say that, I don't mean as it relates to my job. I feel so connected to the human experience, and that is something that has always drawn me in. I lived in a hotel when I was younger because my dad was the general manager of a few hotels, and I would witness and question… there was a complete, big world of people coming in and out of my environment from everywhere in the world. As I started being able to travel more freely and explore different cultures and people, it is something that really interests me. I feel much better when I'm learning new things about new people and cultures. I think that has let to also me wanting to be a storyteller and connect with people on that level. I think that if that is something I can share and encourage in other people to be really open minded and to look outside of their own worlds and communities.  Go bigger and deeper to find something really meaningful. 

Allison Kugel: Interesting. What is the best advice you have ever been given?

Dianna Agron: I don't know if it is the best advice, but it was certainty very helpful to hear as it pertains to my life and my career. I had a colleague say to me, "This path of yours is not about what you say "yes" to. It is more about what you say "no" to. I think as you are receiving gifts, be it jobs, opportunities, etc., it can feel difficult to say no to something, because you are so happy to be there and to be part of the conversation. I think being really honest with yourself about what serves you and how you can organize your time, when you really drop into those truths, so much more magic is available because you're being so authentically yourself and you're not compromising for other people.

As They Made Us, written and directed by Mayim Bialik and starring Dianna Agron, Dustin Hoffman, Candice Bergen and Simon Helberg is out in theatres and on VOD digital platforms April 8th. Listen to and watch the entire interview on the Allison Interviews podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and on YouTube.


Celebrity Interview: Emmy Award Winning Directors Phil Lott and Ari Mark Talk on Making "The Invisible Pilot"


 

Bio: Allison Kugel, is a syndicated entertainment columnist and host of the Allison Interviews podcast. My podcast format is long form conversations with entertainment and pop culture newsmakers. Previous Allison Interviews guests have included: Jewel, Master P, Michael Phelps, Danica Patrick, Tara Reid, Geena Davis, Jodie Sweetin, Tommy Lee, RZA, Shania Twain, Kadeem Hardison, Dianna Agron, and so forth. Her podcasts has been featured quite regularly by top tier outlets, including: TODAYPeopleBuzzFeed, Teen Vogue, US WeeklyAllHipHopUSA TODAY, The Hill, Fox News, New York Post, and many others.

Article is reprinted by permission of Allison Kugel.

Haute Tease

  • Camelback Inn Resort & Spa Review - Epitomizes Southwest Hospitality, Charm and Beauty

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    Scottsdale, Arizona, has become as hot as the desert sun with more than 4.5million tourists visiting each year, and one property has forged its own formidable place in the city’s history: the JW Marriott Camelback Inn Resort & Spa.

     
  • World News: Opposition Leader Alexei Navalny Provokes Russia’s Future

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    Supporters of Alexei Navalny, Russia’s opposition leader and Putin nemesis, who was immediately jailed after returning to Moscow after recuperating from poisoning, have taken to the streets in record number protesting the treatment and demanding his release.

     
  • Beltway Insider: Trump/WH Pandemic Response, Europe Locks Down, Kenny Rogers, Election 2020

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    President Trump, in response to the ever-growing pandemic, this week invoked additional measures in the fight to slow the infection rate of American citizens while simultaneously ensuring the economic free fall doesn't translate into a lasting recession.

     
  • The Highwaymen Review – A Solid Story with Strong Character Driven Performances

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    The Highwaymen, a Netflix original, presents the true story of two Texas Rangers and the race against time to capture of Bonnie and Clyde, the most notorious killers in the history of law enforcement, before they kill again.

     
  • Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO, Announces Retirement

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer has announced his intention to retire from the tech giant founded by Bill Gates sometime over the next twelve months. A search committee is seeking a successor.

     
  • The God Committee Review – Fascinating, Edgy, Contemporary

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    The God Committee, from Vertical Entertainment, presents an insider’s view of the delicate and often harsh decision-making process associated with donor organs when a heart becomes available, and the three patients are all less then desirable candidates.

     
  • Sir Winston’s Restaurant & Lounge Review - The Ultimate Five Star Gourmet Experience

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    Sir Winston's Restaurant & Lounge, RMS Queen Mary, located aboard the historic vessel moored in Long Beach Harbor, is one of the more formal dining destinations in the region offering award winning, five-star cuisine, white glove service against a backdrop of golden romantic ambiance.

     
  • World News: Trump to Approve Israeli West Bank Sovereignty Declaration in Coming Weeks

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

    In an interview released by Israel Hayom Wednesday morning, US Ambassador to Israel David Friedman said the  application of Israeli sovereignty to 30% of the West Bank is expected soon and will be approved by the Trump administration.